Visiting Hoi An – coffee, bubble tea, a temple, a bridge and more

It was a new day, and a new adventure. It was time to explore Hoi An. It seemed quiet again, and slightly overcast, which took the edge off the heat.

About Hoi An

Hoi An Town is an exceptionally well-preserved example of a Southeast Asian trading port dating from the 15th to the 19th century. Its buildings and its street plan reflect the influences, both indigenous and foreign, that have combined to produce this unique heritage site.

Vietnam Guide

Phin Coffee Workshop

While I found the home of Phin Coffee yesterday, it turns out they have a 2nd location, even closer to my hotel.

It is also refreshing to find good coffee until 5pm.

The coffee was excellent.

After coffee I went back to the hotel and rested. Around lunchtime I headed out again.

Viet Ngon Restaurant

I found a cute restaurant and ordered a pineapple juice and the chicken with rice.

I thought the price was good, until I saw the portion size of the food.

Afterwards, I headed off for a bubble tea. It was so much fun exploring the alleyways.

BoBaPop Taiwan Lattea

This place was a bit off the track, but worth it. The tea was great and the artwork and branding was adorable.

Just down the road was a fantastic temple, that I had all to myself.

Confucius Temple

Behind an impressive gate emblazoned with Chinese chu nho characters that simply translate as ‘Confucius Temple’, this magnificent temple to the west of all the action is a colourful explosion of ceramic tiles. Look out for the spirit wall across the bridge that depicts a ky lan, a mythical chimerical creature often depicted in Confucian temples. At the rear is an effigy of Confucius (Khong Tu), venerated in the ‘Great Achievement Hall’.

With a dragon at each corner, the memorial pillar directly across the street overlooks a lotus-flower filled pond.

Lonely Planet

After my leisurely self-guided tour, I headed back towards the Old Town.

Stopping to look at the Nha tho Tin Lanh Chi Hoi Evangelical church.

Then crossing the road to the Old Town.

I understand that Hoi An has had a boost in international tourism in recent years. That explains the “no photo” signs up at some places in the Old Town.

I reached the old Japanese Bridge.

Japanese Covered Bridge

One of Vietnam’s most iconic attractions, Hoi An’s Japanese covered bridge dates back to the 18th century and is a beautiful historical piece of Japanese architecture. It is claimed that it was created by the Japanese then living in Hoi An as a way to reach the Chinese quarter across the water.

The bridge was opened by Nguyen Phuc Chu Lord in 1719 who carved three Chinese symbols above the door in commemoration. The bridge also features the sculptures of two dogs and two monkeys representing the Chinese years in which many Japanese Emperors were born along with the fact that the building of the bridge began in the year of the dog and was completed in the year of the monkey.

The Japanese Covered Bridge underwent renovation work in 1986 which saw the restoration of the arch that was once flattened to make way for cars. Today, the bridge stands as a symbol of Hoi An and remains as aesthetically pleasing as it was when it first opened.

Vietnam Guide

It was time for 2nd coffee. So I headed towards Phin Coffee again.

Phin Coffee Garden

It was such a refuge to sit in this place and drink good coffee.

And meet the wildlife.

They had an interesting coffee personality guide on the wall inside.

Not 100% sure if I agree with it…

Then I walked back to the hotel.

I decided to write a blog about my remote-working experience this year.

Time to grab dinner.

E Village Hoi An

This restaurant was fast becoming my go-to.

Next I decide to walk the dinner off.

At night, heaps of tourists drop flaming lanterns in the river. It is very pretty, but terrible for the environment.

I guess this is why every morning, a local person collects all the floating lantern rubbish from the river.

It really is an enjoyable little town.

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